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Training & socialization

One of the most important things about the Black Russian Terrier is training. Not just sit , lay down, or to bark for a treat. This dog needs boundaries, limitations, and rules. They like knowing exactly what is expected. That is why consistent quality training, and owner/family committment to the training is necessary. Although easily trained the BRT needs time invested in his socialization with people, other dogs, and exposure to many situations. Errors and mistakes need to be adrressed immediately. So no sitting on the couch saying "no" 15 times, and then in frustration getting up and over correcting.

People say "pick your battles". But if you take on every tiny disturbance when it occurs (and the dog is relatively tiny too)...then soon there are less disturbances, and probably no battles.

Socialization is so important, that when a new litter is born...the breeders start inviting everyone over for an ongoing socialization party. Or so it seems. Invitations come in to fly across country and help socialize.

But all kidding aside....once it is old enough to have its own immune system up and running, the puppy should be gently introduced to increasingly complicated situations. First it might be a new toy in the room. Then it might be another room. Kind strangers. The sound of small things dropping. And so on, until at 3-4 months old you can walk down the street, and the garbage truck doesn't send him hiding. Or, a squirrel runs across the side walk, and your arm isnt' broken trying to restrain him. It will be very important for the dog to learn that you decide if he should stand in front of you when someone approaches.

This too is when the dog does NOT learn to sit in laps, and get on the couch and master's bed, unless you want the same in a year at 90+ lbs. This is when bullying is prevented. Taking things from children, knocking grandma over, jumping up on the mail man, or worse yet trying to take his leg off, are really naughty things. Rather than solve a problem later...don't let it get to the problem stage. Nip it in the bud, and be sure you are not nurturing the very behavior you should be disagreeing with.