Health

The Black Russian Terrier is a robust and active breed when given something to do. Activity, nutrition, training, disease prevention, living conditions, temperament, and socialization are all part of the health of your dog.

Here we can provide just a few links. Do your homework and research. Remember the rules about reliable sources. They are based on data or true experience, and to be a good source, more than one or two people are talking about it, and hopefully they are citing the source, so you can go see it for yourself.

Buy the best dog food you can comfortably afford. You can also feed a homemade diet, and a completely raw diet. Always read about your breeds' needs, and how to monitor and use homemade or raw diets. Not the best Idea to just throw a hunk of road kill out there and expect the best results. Be aware what allergies look like. It can be scratching, hair falling out, runny eyes, ear infections and a host of other things. Canine First Aide is a good idea too. Find a vet before you need one. Below is a great economical delivered pet food service (don't forget to order for the cat too). And a pet food rating site.

This is a large and heavy boned dog, espeicially the males. The timing of exercise can mean a lot to bone health and developement. Generally, BRT owners will hold off on heavy exersise; and definitely exercise on pavement. Running with a young dog on hard surfaces can damage bones, muscle and connective tissue. Too much weight on the back can cause problems as well. Many owners feel that 18-24 months is when harder work, to promote conditioning of the body can slowly commence.

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The test for Hyperuricosuria (HUU) in Black Russian Terriers is becoming more critical to have done. Several medical/veterinary, research, and genetic facilities and organizations, are closely watching BRT's.

Data being developed is pointing towards a trend that is showing increases in the numbers of carrier, and affected dogs. That is all it takes to pass it on. Matched with another dog with one gene, there is a 1 in 4 chance that puppies from those parents will have the disease, and 1 in 2 chance they will carry it. That is a ratio of one clear dog, to 2 with one gene, and one with HUU. So what is important here is that genetic traits are a gamble. And just because an animal, or person for that matter, do not show symptoms...it does not mean it cannot be passed on to dogs and people who may suffer.

The only way to lessen the incidence of this painful, and expensive disease, is to STOP breeding mating pairs, that carry more than one copy of the gene between them. The only way to erradicate it, is to stop breeding any dog with a copy of the gene.

We test. We very carefully check the results of each potential breeding pair, and we will make sure that not more than one gene can be passed down. Our goal is to breed with other dogs without the gene. We are aiming for a line of Black Russian Terriers without any chance of the HUU gene.

There is testing for eyes, organs, blood, and so many things. It is generally thought the top 7 which are loged and data is developed for are: Hips, Elbows, Patella, Cardiac, Eyes (CERF), Thyroid and HUU. The links above will take you to appropriate authority for each subject we touched on here.